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HIR 

371.8976 
PIL 
1931 



BUTTNER'S 

DEPARTMENT STORE 
Plymouth, Mass. 

Our Policy — 

QUALITY, SERVICE, PRICE — 

is responsible for our steady growth, here, 

as in all our other stores: 

NORTH PLYMOUTH HYANNIS HARWICHPORT 

WEST DENNIS SANDWICH 

BUTTNER'S — Where a child may trade with confidence 

Sales Service 

DUTTON MOTOR CAR CO. 

NO. PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

GENERAL MOTORS PRODUCTS 

OLDSMOBILE CHEVROLET 



U. S. TIRES 



REPAIRING 

Tel. Ply. 1500-W 



WRECKING SERVICE 
Res. 1500-R 



When There's Better Work Done, 




We'll Do It 






GEO. GOODING 8C SON 


JOHN H. GOVI 




TAILOR 


JEWELERS OPTICIANS 


Main St., - - Plymouth 





WALK-OVER SHOES 

FOR DRESS AND SPORT WEAR 

(Plenty of rejects and jobs #4.95 and #5.95) 

Headquarters for 

Genuine Bass Moccasins 

SEAVER'S 

Walk-Over Shoe Store 

Corner Main and North Streets, Plymouth 
"Where you bought the basketball shoes" 




THE PILGRIM 



Volume X 




Plymouth, 


Mass., 


June, 1931 




No. IV 




Published four times during the school 


year 




25 Cents Single Copy 








75 Cents 


i a Year 



1930 THE PILGRIM STAFF 1931 

Editor-in-Chief .-_ Katharine Davis 

Literary Editor _ - _ - Lois Davee 

Assistant Literary Editor - • - -. - - Annette Chapman 

Business Manager Francis Broadbent 

Assistant Business Manager Gilda Cappanarri 

Boys' Athletics -------- Enzo Bongiovanni 

Girls' Athletics RUBY JOHNSON 

Art ______ Muriel Anderson 

Exchange Editor - - Emma Wirzburger 

Assistant Exchange Editor Gilbert Harlow 

Alumni Editor ----- Mary Ryan 

Joke Editor - Thelma Birnstein 

Assistant Joke Editor Elmer Collier 

School News Editor Jane Bittinger 

Assistant School News Editor - Florence Probst 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS 

CLASS POEM ._--..-. .4 

HISTORY OF CLASS OF 1931 5 

LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT - - - 7 

CLASS PROPHECY ------- - 9 

CLASS GIFTS -------- -12 

MY CLASS OF 1931 20 

PICTURE OF CLASS OF 1931 ----- - 21 

HAPPY DAYS -------- .22 

LITERATURE 

By Us in Germany ------- -23 

A Senior's Soliloquy ------ -23 

Life Was Wonderful ______ -24 

You Shine For Us------- -25 

On First Looking Into Burke's "Speech on Conciliation" - 25 

Principal's Column ------- -25 

A Kitchen Lyric ------- -26 

The Hero --------- - 26 

UNDER THE WHITE CUPOLA - - 27 

FROM A GRADUATE ------- -28 

EXCHANGE - - 29 

ATHLETICS --------- -30 

LE FRANQAIS - 32 

EL ESPANOL -------- .34 



THE PILGRIM 3 

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IlI 



THE PILGRIM 



THE PAST 

History of Class of 1931 

"pXTRA! Extra! All about the 
Class of '31," yelled the small 
boy laboring tediously under his 
great pack of papers almost as 
large as himself. "Read all about 
the graduating class of P. H. S. in 
full detail". 

"Here, boy, one paper," called a 
passerby, as he heard the familiar 
words of "P. H. S." Stanley Gil- 
bert, President of the Class of '27, 
handed the boy a nickle, retired to 
a park bench, and opened the 
paper. "Well, well, if here isn't a 
reprint from "The Pilgrim", of the 
Class History, composed by Emma 
Wirzburger and Argio Rebuttini! 
Why, it must be that my little 
Freshman friends are ready to go 
forth to conquer the world. Now 
let's see what has happened to 
them since I left school." 

New Principal To Greet 
Freshmen ! ! 

When the Freshman class en- 
tered the Plymouth High School in 
the year nineteen hundred and 
twenty-seven, they were greeted 
by a new principal. In this year 
Wayne M. Shipman assumed the 
duties of this office, and because of 
his kind and helpful attitude to all, 
he at once won the love of his many 
pupils. With his coming, many 
changes commenced to take place. 

The introduction of the "Wool- 
worth Plan" for the purpose of 
supporting student activities, was 
vastly aided by the Freshies who 
generously (?) offered their dime 
each and every week. 

And may wonders never cease! 
It was in that year that "Pete" and 
"King" Fratus found their name 
engraved upon the first Honor Roll 
of the year. Their sensibilities 
were visibly shocked, and there 
was no recurrence of the event dur- 
ing the next three years. 

To this very day Elsie Danti re- 
grets the evil impulse which made 
her ask a real Indian Chief to give 
an Indian War Whoop for her, 
while he was engaged in lecturing 
on the customs of his tribe at one 
of our assemblies. 



The overwhelming success of the 
Chinese Dragons (composed of 
groups under three leaders) in 
compelling their victims to sub- 
scribe to a magazine, the profits to 
be used for furthering school 
sports, displayed excellent sales 
ability in our class even at this 
early stage in our career. 
Football Champs// 

Although we had passed through 
our first year of probation, we were 
doomed again to be the lower 
classmen in our Sophomore year, 
for at this time the two-session 
plan went into effect. 

But we were somewhat consoled 
when "Charlie the First" placed 
the Plymouth High School in the 
limelight by producing a cham- 
pionship football team, the first in 
many years. 

It was during this year that 
"Dot" Co veil came to school one 
morning with her new bob! Mr. 
Consodine thought he had a new 
boy in his class, but he soon dis- 
covered his error. 

Bruno Zangheri, through his un- 
usual musical and histrionic abil- 
ities displayed in "The Mikado", 
brought unforgettable glory to his 
Alma Mater and to himself. 

The establishment of the Nation- 
al Honor Society in our school at 
this time was not of immediate 
concern to the "Sophs", for mem- 
bers were not eligible until they 
were in their Junior Year. 
Successful Juniors// 

The Jolly-Juniors entered their 
third year of high school with the 
intention of doing greater things, 
and their aim was realized. 

The school paper (ably sup- 
ported by these same Juniors) was 
awarded the shield for the best 
school publication in the South- 
eastern League. Some of our class 
members numbered among those 
on the staff were "Kay" Davis and 
Gilda Cappannari, while several 
articles included in the issues 
were written by the "thirty-oners." 

Once again (this time under 
"Chief") we were recognized as 
the Football Champions of the dis- 
trict. Of course, much of the credit 
should be given to our class, for 
wasn't the cheering squad chiefly 



THE PILGRIM 



composed of our members? Some 
of those games certainly were 
dusty! To the entire satisfaction 
and approval of all, none other 
than our own "Sparky" was elected 
captain of the next year's football 
team. 

It was at this time that an odd 
combination of facts was noted. A 
teacher often had to shout in order 
to make "Sully" hear, but, he al- 
ways heard any whispered com- 
ment made by one of his class- 
mates. 

The "Voodoo Minstrels" and the 
"Crimson Cocoanut" displayed 
more ability in our class. "Tommy" 
as an endman, and Bruno as a 
Russian Count brought forth much 
applause from the audience. 

The Junior Promenade was 
sponsored by our class. For days 
there were comments about the 
school to the effect that it was the 
most successful and the best 
"money-maker" of any ever pre- 
sented in the history of the school. 
The hall was effectively trimmed 
in blue and white, the work of 
"Dick" Young and his staff, who 
showed all the characteristics of 
successful interior decorators. 

The boys and girls who were 
ushers at the Senior Commence- 
ment exercises looked so very dig- 
nified and stately that we could 
easily visualize them on their own 
graduation night — only one year 
away. 

1931 ! ! 

And so came the last year of our 
enrollment in our beloved school. 

To the Football Champs for a 
third successive year we tendered 
our Senior Dance, which was one 
of the best-attended affairs of the 
season. Some of our girls under- 
took to present a performance sim- 
ilar to that of the boys on the field, 
a football scrimmage — and Alice 
almost forgot she was supposed to 
be injured. 

Invited by A. R. Parker to visit 
his plant, two bus loads of Seniors 
traveled noisily to Bridgewater 
where the process of pasteurizing 
milk was demonstrated and ex- 
plained. The refreshments were 
most welcome to all. The ride 
home, especially in the second bus, 



will long be remembered. 

"It Pays To Advertise", the 
school play, was presented in the 
spring, Mary (Poodles) Tracy, as 
the heroine, and Katharine Bur- 
gess, the French madamoiselle (we 
don't believe she knew a word she 
was saying. We didn't.) were two 
of the outstanding players. 

Why did the bus going to Whit- 
man for the girls' basketball game 
return to P. H. S.? Oh, yes, it 
neglected to wait for "Schnupps", 
Em, Jo, and some of the players. 

A most beautiful affair, in the 
matter of decorations, was the 
Spanish Fiesta, for the first time 
held under the supervision of the 
Seniors. Moonlight dancing in a 
Spanish garden — visions of Spain ! 

Every class has its Romeo and 
Juliet. Ours is no exception, we 
hope. 

"Tie A Little String Around 
Your Finger" was especially writ- 
ten for "Jo" Nunes. Very appro- 
priate, we must say. 

The deeds of certain members of 
the Class of 1931 deserve especial 
mention : 

"Bobby" Armstrong has been 
our Class President for four years, 
a record very seldom equalled. 

Antone "Sparky" Spath has the 
distinction of being one of the 
finest athletes ever graduated from 
P. H. S. He has helped to uphold 
the standard of good sportsman- 
ship among the players. 

Katharine "Kay" Davis filled her 
Secretaryship exceedingly well, 
and, as Editor-in-chief of "The Pil- 
grim", has won a high place for 
herself in everyone's heart. 

Emma "Em" Wirzburger has 
been particularly efficient in guard- 
ing the Class Treasury. 

Bruno Zangheri, our future 
operatic star, did splendid work in 
"The Mikado", the "Crimson Cocoa- 
nut", and "It Pays To Advertise." 

To the strains of "My Class of 
'31" the first class to come and go 
under Wayne M. Shipman's super- 
vision, said farewell to its Alma 
Mater, and, diploma in hand, on 
June 18, 1931, prepared to take the 
world by storm. 



"Well, well, one year is much 
like another, after all, though no 
class realizes that at the time," and 



THE PILGRIM 



with these words Stanley Gilbert 
folded his paper and went on his 
way. 

Emma Wirzburger 
Argio Rebuttini 

LAST WILL AND 
TESTAMENT 

RE IT REMEMBERED that We, 
the CLASS OF 1931, of Plym- 
outh High School, in the county of 
Plymouth, Commonwealth of Mass- 
achusetts, being of sound mind and 
memory, (despite the peculiarities 
of ancestors who could allow a 
Seven Years' War to endure for one 
hundred years,) but knowing the 
uncertainty of this jazz-ridden life 
and knowing that we are destined 
to be overrun by this sudden visita- 
tion of Baby Austins which, locust- 
like, are devastating our Pilgrim 
sod, do make this our last will and 
testament, hereby revoking any 
and all wills or promises heretofore 
made to any person or persons with 
that rare characteristic of having 
believed us to have been serious : 

To Mr. Shipman : Loud applause 
for your gift of seven-period days, 
for two of which, may it be remem- 
bered, we willingly "dug deep," and 
brought forth a shining copper. 

To Mrs. Raymond: Our sincere 
appreciation of your efforts to 
penetrate our minds with the fact 
that the verb "to be" never-never- 
takes an object, and with the fact 
that we should really follow 
Hamlet's example in acquiring the 
habit of thought. 

To Mr. Smiley: A set of new 
and serviceable biology books, to 
save the worthy steno's the duty 
of preparing his information re- 
garding the actions of man and the 
reasons why fish have bones in such 
inconspicuous places. 

To Mr. Fash : A group of P. G's 
who will not insist on submitting 
their knowledge of the S. 0. S. 
upon the poor innocents of Room I. 

To Mr. Young: A pal. We al- 
ways wondered where Bud Fisher 
conceived his idea of latitude and 
longitude. 

To Miss Dowling: A book on 



architecture, that you may culti- 
vate your interest in the aforesaid 
field. 

To Miss Wilbur: A few more 
Deacons' and Dicksons' to play the 
jester in her Fresh-Men classes, 
who unanimously declare Latin to 
be very essential to their vocabu- 
lary. 

To Miss Kelly : A group of en- 
thusiastic office girls who will not 
expect kindness in return for close 
harmony, and also a folio of song 
hits in which "Sweet Jenny Lee" 
is not included. 

To Miss Judd : A stop watch. It 
will be much more practical in dic- 
tating for speed, and wrist- watches 
will not have to be borrowed. 

To Miss Lang: Our hope that 
she has enjoyed her first year as 
teacher in the school which she at- 
tended as a high school pupil. 

To Chief Bagnall: A fire ex- 
tinguisher, which may aid him in 
preventing "woods fires," which, 
we understand, some lofty senior 
may start by wearing a pencil over 
his ear. Wood against wood causes 
friction, and so we are in danger 
of fires. 

To Miss Ries : A Baby Austin to 
convey you safely to and from 
school. It will be more enjoyable ; 
time schedules and dimes can be 
ignored. 

To Mrs. Swift: A caddy, or, 
perchance, an assistant to carry 
your wire rack from room to room. 
If not suitable, a traveling bag may 
be obtained by registering request 
with our class treasurer. 

To Miss Helen C. Johnson : An 
encyclopedia to be used in answer- 
ing innumerable questions for- 
warded by Clarence Fortini. 

To Miss Baker: Some talented 
musicians to participate in the 
juggling of the French vocabulary 
set to the tune of the "Marseill- 
aise." Possibly it would be wise to 
donate a pitch pipe to aid the 
violinist and singers to find the 
right key. However, "all's well 
that ends well." 



8 



THE PILGRIM 



To Miss Locklin: A pair of 
gloves, (preferably not white), to 
be used in pounding the keys of the 
piano in an effort to extract music 
from its injured organs, without 
soiling your hands. 

To Miss Cummings: Adequate 
room to accommodate the young 
would-be housewives in preparing 
that "Home you love to see." 

To Mrs. Garvin: Two worthy 
co-captains to maintain the morale 
of the teams, and praises galore 
from Monsieur X (Unknown quan- 
tity), of the Big Red House, to be 
bestowed upon your "Charlie." 

To Mr. Smith : A new manager 
to execute faithfully the demands 
of the Woolworth Plan, and a new 
set of initials that will not tempt 
the "young flighty things" to call, 
"J. H." 

To All Freshmen Teachers: 
Courage; Rome wasn't built in a 
day. 

To the Class of 1932: Our 
lockers : they may need a cleaning, 
but they are worth it. A warning is 
issued, however, that you do not 
buy keys unless you wish to employ 
a locksmith to open the locker 
doors for you. 

To the Class of 1933: Lots of 
room. You'll need it if people in- 
sist upon having one-way traffic 
(each has his own idea of which 
way is The One.) 

To the Class of 1934: Self- 
control; your spirit of independ- 
ence is not to be exercised in the 
presence of your superiors. 

To Clarence Fortini : Sparky's 
physique to be exercised on field 
and floor, and you will soon become 
a brawny hero in the eyes of every- 
one. Have faith: "Big oaks from 
little acorns grow." 

To Francis Broadbent : A billy 
club to aid you in teaching those 
who insist upon "scratching the 
varnish" of P. H. S. grounds, that 
you mean business. 

To John Bradford : Mary Gray- 
son to share his weary moments, 



and to accompany him as he ma- 
nipulates his car ( ?) along the 
Hillside Boulevard. 

To "Tip" Cavallini and his 
Associates: A good round half- 
dollar that you may all obtain a 
haircut suitable to your size and 
shape, but not in the style of the 
Kollege Kuts. 

To Adele Cohen : The book en- 
titled "How and Where to Use 
Cosmetics." There's a time and 
place for everything. 

To Phyllis Smith: The right 
to succeed Miss Edna Wallace 
Hopper. Tune in at 2:30, Station 
BLAH, and you will be astounded 
at what may be accomplished with 
the tongue in a very short space of 
time. 

To Pete Ferioli: A profession 
that suits your abilities. As a 
woman-hater you're a fake, and 
dog catching is not a promising 
position even for a man possessing 
such "taking ways." 

To Ruby Johnson: A car with 
yellow wheels with a dashing 
young Romeo in the driver's seat. 

To Eugenia Morton: High 
hopes that her heart's desire will 
come true. They say that Scotch- 
men are tight. We wonder in what 
respects? For further information 
apply to Anne Harlow, who knows 
Scotchmen rather well. 

To Donald McLean: A new 
sweater: red and white pulls too 
much at the heart strings of the 
girl who knows who really owns 
the one you are wearing now. 

To The Girls: John Sears, the 
Myles Standish of the Senior Class, 
with Thomas Dries to impersonate 
John Alden. 

To One Who May Be Inter- 
ested: Richard Young's office. 
Will it pleased be notice that it is 
not specifically noted in which 
office duties are to be executed? 

To The Office Girl : A dashing 
young blonde of the male sex, with 
the request that she exercise in- 
fluence upon his choice of profes- 



THE PILGRIM 



9 



sion. A farmer's life is not the 
life — 

To Kenneth Tingley: Louis 
Stein leaves the following sen- 
tences to be correctly punctuated 
in such a manner that they make 
sense : 

1. Put a dash between Boots 
and and and and and Shoes. 

2. That that is is that that is 
not is not is that not it it is. 

3. John while James had had 
had had had had had had had had 
had the approval of the examiner. 

On this sixth day of June, 1931, 
we do hereby in the presence of: 
Bridget O'Flynn 

Dangerous Dan MacGrew 

declare this to be our 
last will and testament, and as 
witnesses thereof, we two do now, 
at the request of, and in the 
presence of each other, hereunto 
sign: 

SEARS 
AND 

ROEBUCK 

Dorothy F. Covell 
Thelma C. Birnstein 



THE FUTURE 
Class Prophecy 

TN high spirits because we had 
just purchased a brand new 1951 
model radio-powered plane, my pal 
and I decided to put her to good 
use. Twenty years had elapsed 
since graduation from Plymouth 
High School, and we considered it 
high time to find out just how our 
classmates were faring. Our first 
port of call was Washington, D. C, 
to which, in increasing numbers as 
the years passed by, many of our 
friends who had always been con- 
sidered ambitious and political- 
minded had migrated. 

Unlike many who visit the Cap- 
itol, we had a very personal reason 
for paying our respects at the 
White House. During our school 
days we had rarely seen Katharine 
Davis upset by the pressure of her 
many duties, and now, as private 
secretary to the president, she was 
her usual calm and efficient self. 
She ushered us into the presence 
Of the chief executive of the nation, 
Robert Armstrong, just as Verna 



Hurle and Viola Hunter were leav- 
ing. They had presumed upon their 
personal acquaintance with the 
president to ask him to use his au- 
thority against Alice Lema, Eliza- 
beth Hayes, and Mary Ryan who 
insisted upon using the radio in 
their apartment from dawn till 
dark in the faint hope that they 
might again hear the voice of Bru- 
no Zangheri. Bruno was with the 
Metropolitan Opera Company, we 
discovered, but upon rare occasions 
he broadcast negro spirituals for 
the Calnan & Landry School for 
Girls. 

On our way out we met a very 
well-dressed gentleman who seemed 
familiar, and then we both real- 
ized almost at the same time that 
this distinguished personage Was 
Thomas Dries. We learned that he 
was a lobbyist, and that he was 
about to try to convince President 
Armstrong that Argio Rebuttini 
should be granted a monopoly in 
the retail fruit business. 

Wishing him luck, we trundled 
over to the U. S. Mint where 
Richard Young ruled as head of 
the Dime Department, Gilda Cap- 
panari acting as his assistant. The 
department had been showing a 
neat profit since the day when 
Richard had accepted the advice of 
Mary Tracy, famed financial wiz- 
ard. She had instituted the idea of 
a new rate of exchange — eleven 
new dimes returned for each tat- 
tered dollar bill — to any high 
school pupil who could prove that 
he was a regular contributor to the 
Ten-Cents-A-Week Plan. 

We found Louis Stein in charge 
of the Department of Perplexing 
Problems. Here he operated a sort 
of national information bureau — 
and guaranteed within forty-eight 
hours an answer to any and all 
problems troubling any citizen. He 
had been appointed to this office di- 
rectly after he had leaped to fame 
by refuting the Einstein Theory 
and advancing the simpler Stein 
Theory. Many of the problems that 
were received by Stein were sent 
for solution to a sub-bureau in 
charge of Jane Burns, who used the 
new Burns Equations in finding the 
value of X. 



10 



THE PILGRIM 



We then entered our plane and 
flew to a town that we knew very 
well to be the well-ordered and 
peaceful town of Plymouth. We 
hovered over the Shipman Memo- 
rial Field where a ball game was 
taking place and were finally able 
to distinguish the figure of Sparkie 
Spath, manager of the Clam Town 
Cubs as he instructed A. Scag- 
liarini in the fine art of hitting 
home runs. The one-man cheering 
squad we could easily recognize by 
the voice. It was our old friend, 
Joe Sullivan. 

On another part of the field 
spring hockey practice was in ses- 
sion with Mary Deans as instruc- 
tor. She had called in Josephine 
Nunes and Dorothy Covell for a 
demonstration of how it was done 
in the good old days. 

We landed at the Plymouth 
Country Club where Instructor 
Vickery was endeavoring to show 
John Donovan how he made two 
holes in one shot. The expression 
on John's face was both dubious 
and admiring. 

These two gentlemen forsook 
their game long enough to tell us 
how to get to Balboni's Barber 
Shoppe. There we found the pro- 
prietor administering a Sea Wave 
to the tresses of Hilda Goddard. 
We were forced to leave when Mr. 
Balboni became too insistent about 
the merits of the Balboni Zip. 
Simply because we went to school 
with him was no reason why he 
should feel hurt because we were 
unwilling for him to practice upon 
us. 

In the same building we saw 
in gold letters "Govi — Imported 
Gowns." Through the window we 
caught a glimpse of one of her 
models — Agnes Feci. And we had 
never suspected that she had a 
secret passion for clothes ! 

On the floor below we found 
Ceccarelli's Cleaning and Pressing 
Emporium. The proprietor was 
trying to convince Iris Campbell 
that he could clean her rare cob- 
web dance slippers, but Iris thought 
cob-webs were inclined to be too 
perishable. Iris' companion, Thelma 
Birnstein, insisted that Iris could 
take Mr. Ceccarelli's word in view 
of the fact that he had had a repu- 



tation for honesty in his high 
school days. 

Once again upon the sidewalk 
we met Elsie Danti, who graciously 
allowed us to escort her to 
Crossley's Market where she pur- 
chased ham from pigs that had 
made perfect hogs of themselves — 
and this was no bologney. Elsie 
invited us to dinner at her house, 
and remembering that Elsie never 
did things by halves, we accepted. 
The dinner was good. 

Later that evening we ambled 
down to Maxwell's Community 
Playhouse where a mirth-provok- 
ing comedy by Hanelt & Arthur 
was in progress. Katharine Burgess 
was the leading lady, but she 
shared honors with Ruth Armes, 
the comedienne. Pathe News 
showed pictures of Robert Holmes 
at his Florida home. These days 
his name meant power — and he 
was giving the children — not 
dimes — but quarters. 

During intermission we pur- 
chased a "Daily Pole", an out- 
growth of the old "Saturday Even- 
ing Post." We noticed that the 
cover design was one of great 
merit — and then quickly realized 
the reason why. It was by Muriel 
Anderson. And the largest adver- 
tisement described the merits of 
antique furniture made by Martin- 
elli's Patented Worm-Hole Borer. 

After the show we hurried over 
to John William Reed's Candy 
Store for something good to eat. 

John's official candy-taster, Eliz- 
abeth Venturi, very kindly made 
us a present in memory of old high 
school days. It was a five-pound 
box of Reed's famous Plymouth 
Rock Candy. Pleased by the spirit 
which prompted the gift, we 
sought the owner and compli- 
mented him upon his business abil- 
ity. (After we left, we sampled the 
candy. It was made of Quincy 
Granite.) On the way out we passed 
the cashier's desk. Black eyes 
gazed at us suspiciously as they 
noted the package in our posses- 
sion, for which, of course, we 
hardly felt it necessary to pay. In 
fact, we weren't even going to ex- 
plain until we recognized the eyes. 
They belonged to Addie Scaramelli. 

In the course of the conversa- 
tion that followed, Addie informed 



THE PILGRIM 



11 



us that relatives in England had 
willed Fannie Zavalcofsky five 
thousand pounds. She had decided 
that she was heavy enough and had 
given the pounds to Sarah Skulsky 
before she realized that pounds 
meant money — not weight. With 
the money Sarah immediately 
bought out Ethel Dretler's Depart- 
ment Store and induced her sister 
Rose to leave a position in Boston 
in order to work for her. It seemed 
that Sarah had grown very quiet 
and reserved. She no longer liked 
to talk to people. Rose was to in- 
terview all the salesmen. 

Wanting more amusement, we 
strolled over to the Casino where 
Ameglio Fortini held the amuse- 
ment concession. Two of the high 
scorers at the bowling alleys are 
Dorothy Siever and Marguerite 
Raymond. Incidentally these girls 
had made money and were now en- 
gaged in spending it. They had 
bought a certain aviation stock 
which had gone up for an endur- 
ance record. 

Then we found that Manager 
Pratt of the local A & P was hav- 
ing a sale on dog biscuits. He rec- 
ognized us as possible customers, 
and launched into a sales talk so 
convincing that we bought fifty 
pounds before we remembered that 
we had no dog. We couldn't carry 
our purchase with us, Pratt re- 
fused to store it, so we sent it 
home by Lawrence's Interstate Ex- 
press. 

Gordon Barke ran up to us and 
asked us if we would help him. He 
wanted to show the crowd a trick 
with a little electric device that he 
had invented — but he could find no 
one to try it on. Gordon looked so 
appealing that we consented. 
Briefly — we found ourselves in the 
Jordan Hospital twenty minutes 
later — but Gordon escaped unin- 
jured. The trick hadn't worked be- 
cause our heads had made such 
perfect dry cells. 

_ The superintendent of the hos- 
pital, Doris Saracca, was in the 
room next to ours. Ever kind, she 
was reading stories to Irene Sassi, 
who had sprained her hand when 
she slipped on a banana peel in her 
eagerness to discover the identity 
of the tall man who had just moved 
to town. 



Frances Talbot was also a 
patient in the hospital. She had 
collapsed when her good friend, 
Phyllis Morse, told her that she 
had decided to move to Duxbury. 

Helen McCormick was there, too. 
She had laughed herself sick one 
night while listening over the radio 
to Martha Kabelsky's famous 
"laughter." 

When she learned that we were 
in the hospital, Arlene Vassar 
brought Madeline Northrup to call 
upon us. And Arlene was not driv- 
ing a Ford these days, but a brand 
new Lincoln. Madeline said that 
she had just received a post-card 
from Josephine Longinotti who 
was taking advanced work in 
French at the Sorbonne. 

We learned that Emma Wirz- 
burger had recently been elected 
Head of the Commercial Depart- 
men in Plymouth High School, and 
in the same building Dolores Guido- 
boni was holding sway in Room 10. 

Later we had another visitor 
who came bearing a huge basket of 
the choicest fruits. Eunice told us 
that she had just learned of our ac- 
cident from Evelyn Sloan who had 
stopped at Cavicchi's Consolidated 
Fruit Store to buy a thingama- 
jigger, and she had hastened to ex- 
tend us her sympathy. She tried 
valiantly to cheer the invalids with 
small talk, during the course of 
which we discovered that Evelyn 
Everson had not yet married a 
certain Big Boy, but that Hazel 
Raymond had married her saxo- 
phone player and was living 
happily ever after. And knowing 
very well that all good pieces of 
highly-imaginative writing con- 
clude with that happy-ever-after 
stuff, we hasten to write 
Finis. 

R. King Fratus 
John H. Sears 



i 



i 



GUY W. COOPER 
General Merchandise 



Jabez Corner 



I Telephone 258 Plymouth, Mass. 



12 



THE PILGRIM 



(Class (lifts 




k?7-vj£ > Muriel Anderson 

^30^ To you, our kind cartoonist, 

^r7 " We give a hearty hand, 

Muriel Anderson And as a famous artist 

You'll be known o'er all the land. 



RUTH 

ARME2 




Ruth Armes 
Jerking sodas, scooping ice-cream, 
Dashing to and fro — 
Sometimes humming, always smiling, 
Everywhere you go. 



Robert Armstrong 
In all the ways you could 
In things that came to pass, 
For four long years you served us well 
ROBERT ARMSTRONG Ag pres ident of our class. 




LI LUIAN 

A RTHUR 



Lillian Arthur 
Would you learn to cook and sew? 
'Tis a really pleasing art, 
If you go to Lil — we know 
She will try to do her part. 



qOR DON RARKE 




NELSON 
BA L IboN I 



Gordon Barke 
Think of red suspenders 
When you see an old Ford sway, 
Add a dozen different noises 
And behold! You have Barke. 



Nelson Balboni 
At all the girls he smiles, 
But deep down inside 
Between blonde and brunette 
He cannot decide. 



-THELMA 
Bl RNSTEIN 





Thelma Birnstein 
"Mothballs" is what we call you, 
Our "Tom Boy" of Plymouth High- 
But it's as a speedy typist 
That we'll see you bye-and-bye. 



Katharine Burgess 
KAi HARI NE Our new classmate from Carolina, 
Burg ESS We ask nor seek for anything finer, 
S s s.„ T , T\ Your drawling voice we all admire — 
T^"<»-i-j^ Your acting set our hearts afire. 



THE PILGRIM 



13 




O'ANE 
BURN3 



THY 
NAN 



R 15 

CAMPBEJ.L 




Jane Burns 

Jane's a whizz at Mathematics, 
And she's good at hockey, too. 
There's one thing we'd like to say, Jane, 
You're a good Scout, through and 
through. 



GlLDA CAPPANNARI 

"G. Cap" inscribed on every book, 
On every desk, by every hook, 
A rubber stamp with your whole name 
Is yours to stamp the scroll of fame. 



Dorothy Calnan 
What's wrong with Dorothy Calnan? 
Not a thing that we can see. 
She's in the Honor Society 
And as busy as the bee. 



EUNICE 



CAVl CCH 1 



L ETO 
CE CCARELM 



OOROT H Y COVEU 





£DMOND 
C ROSSLEY 



Iris Campbell 
This little girl 
(And little is right) 
Is surely a pearl 
Tho' not of great height. 



Eunice Cavicchi 
Some days you're cheery, 
Other days you're blue, 
Now why not be happy 
All the day through ? 



Leo Ceccarelli 
He has the class, 
He has the style. 
For an "Iris" lass 
He has a smile. 



Dorothy Covell 
Dorothy's fine at hockey 
And at other sports, 'tis true — 
So "Speak for yourself, dear John," 
That Dot may not be blue. 



Edmund Crossley 
You should carry a four-leaf clover 
On your frequent trips to Hanover, 
That luck you'll have while coming back 
In your stream-lined Pontiac. 



14 



THE PILGRIM 




elsie: danti 

KATHARINE DAVIS 




MARY DEAN5 





JOHN 
DONO VAN 




ETHEL 

DRETLER 




THOMAS 
DRIES 




EVELYN 

EVEf\50N 



Elsie Danti 
Independence 
All over her face, 
And every boy 
She keeps in his place. 



Katharine Davis 
Numerous tasks has this fair lass, 
Keeping her busy from morn 'til night, 
And everything she ever does 
Is always done just right. 



Mary Deans 
Mary, we wish you success 
And hope that success will be big, 
But that which we wish you the most 
Is success in the study of "trig." 



John Donovan 
Here's a boy 
Who seems very quiet, 
But talk to him 
And what a riot! 



Ethel Dretler 
Quiet though you seem to be, 
We know you think, we'll never doubt it ; 
Here's a megaphone for you, 
Shout and tell the world about it. 



Thomas Dries 
Spats just so, hair slicked down, 
Tie just right, in suit of brown 
Tommy strolls down the high school hall 
Sportily dressed — he beats them all ! 



Evelyn Everson 
Evelyn is a winsome lass — 
'Tis said that she is fond 
Of someone in the Sophomore class- 
Do you suppose it is that blond? 



AGNES* 
FECI 




Agnes Feci 
Agnes is a quiet lass 
Who always does her work, 
So attentive in her class 
She's never known to shirk. 



THE PILGRIM 



15 



FORT I N I 




WOUAN D 



FRAT <J S 



Ameglio Fortini 
He is a silent fellow, 
His thoughts to himself he'll keep — 
But you've heard the old, old proverb, 
It's still waters that run deep. 



Roland Fratus 
Sometime in the near future 
You'll see a flash go by, 
You'll know it's "Roily" Fratus 
Learning how to fly. 



HILDA 

GODDARD 




Hilda Goddard 

Who is whispering over there — 
That note so slyly passed, 
To do these things not all would dare- 
Well — are you in her class? 



Rose Govi 
This girl we must congratulate 
For all the noises that she makes, 
And for always telling jokes 
A handsome prize she takes. 




DOL OKE.S 



GU I D O BO N 



Dolores Guidoboni 
Dolores seeks a goal much higher ; 
She'll win in spite of struggles dire. 
You passed the four-year course in 

three, 
We give this crown of bay to thee. 



LYDlA 
H ANELT 




ELIZABETH 
ttAYES 



HO BERT 
HO U M E 5 



4lM_ 



Lydia Hanelt 
For cooking there are girls galore 
Attempting this and that, 
For sewing there are many more — 
But to Lyd we tip our hat. 



Elizabeth Hayes 
Do you fear the strange and new? 
We're sure we've never heard you boast ; 
We look for something fine from you 
With the highest star as your hitching- 
post. 



Robert Holmes 
"Bo" comes down from Manomet, 
But he's not with us all the time, 
Because he spends the winter 
In a sunny southern clime. 



16 



THE PILGRIM 



VIOLA 
HUNTER 



HU RLE 




V*. 



MARTHA 
K ABELS KY 



BERNICE 
LAN DRY 




F 


dm ml L 


M 


WhJ^B ^ 




*&£&y £"jf W 


M 
A 


A | 




^L, x* ' JF E 




ALICE UEMA 




Viola Hunter 
The Chevelot is gone, we know, 
But now he has a new Ford car, 
He takes her where she wants to go, 
Although it may be near or far. 



Verna Hurle 
Verna sits back just three seats 
But that doesn't bother Joe, 
He turns around, and the seat's loud 

squeak 
Helps him to say, "Hello !" 



Martha Kabelsky 
Martha's neither shy nor bold, 
She has ideas that are her own, 
May she these traits forever hold, 
And others lead to things unknown. 



Bernice Landry 
Helping in the office, 
Running 'round all day; 
You need a pair of roller skates 
To help you on your way. 



Emma Lawrence 
Curly locks and cheeks like roses, 
None with her charms can compare, 
The boys all think she's quiet and shy, 
But they agree that she's fair. 

Alice Lema 
Lessons well done 
Without fail every day, 
The future for her 
Is prepared the right way. 



lSPRlMGFIEUDl 




H 



Josephine Longinotti 
To all the boys 
She gives a smile, 
But her thoughts are 
In Springfield the while. 



Josephine longinotti 




Horace Martinelli 
An antique dealer of great note, 
A strong, hard-working son, 
But be more quiet, if you please, 
When you study in Room One. 



MARTI NELLI 



THE PILGRIM 



17 




HELEN ■ Mo CorkiacK 



Charlotte Maxwell 
At one make way for Charlotte, 
We can't let her be late, 
Or we won't get our tickets 
At the Interstate. 



Helen McCormack 
Did you ever see her roll her eyes, 
Her eyes of Irish blue? 
Be gorry, 'tis a sweet sight, 
We know you'll think so, too. 



PHYLLIS 

MORSE. 





MADEL IN G 
Al ORTH RUP 



JOSEPHINE 
NONES 



GPOffGE 
TK ATT 



H A Z- E U 

RAY MOUD 



Phyllis Morse 
She's an able teacher, 
She substitutes with ease- 
As a French professor 
Phyllis aims to please. 



Madeline Northrup 
When you're a nurse, 
Please let us know, — 
We'll all wish you happiness 
Wherever you go. 



Josephine Nunes 
You're small and dark, you're quick and 

snappy, 
We hope that you'll be always happy, 
But when it comes to foolish questions ! 
"Don't ask them," is our one suggestion. 



George Pratt 
You showed your good school spirit 
And gave the town a great surprise 
When you donned your tramp suit 
To help "It Pays to Advertise." 



Hazel Raymond 
A saxaphone that softly croons 
At dances every night 
Plays such tantalizing tunes — 
Well, Hazel — are we right? 



M ARGUERITE 
<<£ A RA Y M O N D 




Marguerite Raymond 
Marguerite has that thing called 
She's always full of fun — 
She's ever there to do her bit 
For each and every one. 



'It,' 



18 



THE PILGRIM 



ARGIO 
FfEBUTTiN I 




MARY 
T\YAN 



DORIS ^ARACCA 



Argio Rebuttini 
Bananas are his speciality, 
He knows his onions, too, 
Possesses a pleasing personality, 
Not much that he can't do. 



John Reed 
Handsome and tall, 
A Romeo bold — 
He learned it all 
At Robbin's we're told. 



Mary Ryan 
She's an honor student, 
She really is quite bright. 
She has a sense of humor 
In which we all delight. 



Doris Saracca 
Neat and reserved 
Is this fine lass, 
We know as a nurse 
She'll be first class. 




Irene 



Irene Sassi 
Cuddly and cute, 
Just five feet one, 
A neat little parcel — 
And this is no pun. 




S 



A 

G- 

L 

i 

A 

n 
i 



ADDIE SCARAMELLI 



Amedeo Scagliarini 
A king of Swat, 
A pitcher great, 
The major leagues 
To you are bait. 



Addie Scaramelli 
To this fair girl 
Success should come, 
For with a typewriter 
Honor she's won. 




John Sears 
jo hn 5EAR3 Always at 12:30 sharp 

There's rush for locker 4, 

To John's disgust when he arrives 

He finds there girls galore ! 



THE PILGRIM 



19 




^\ DOROTHY 

5IEVER 



R05 E 

And SARAH 
5KUUSKY 



EVELYN ^.LOAN 




Dorothy Siever 
From desk to desk she travels, 
A dime is her demand, 
Always you must have it 
To drop into her hand. 



Rose and Sarah Skulsky 
Rose and Sue have one great art, 
Which they both share together- 
In every dance they take a part, 
Never hindered by the weather. 



Evelyn Sloan 
She's rather small to graduate 
But always there and wide awake, 
One can say this for her sake, 
A girl may often take the cake ! 



An To n 



SPATH 




S 
T 

i 

M 



Antone Spath 
The hero of our high-school days 
Who bravely fought in ev'ry game, 
Our "Sparky" from the Cordage Club- 
In high esteem we'll hold your name. 



Louis Stein 
For Louis Stein 
We expect no less 
Than riches galore 
And the greatest success. 



JOSEPH 




Joseph Sullivan 



5f ll i VAN ^ e use d to play at football 

And made the high school teams, 
But now he plays another game, 
With "the ladies", so it seems. 



France s 
ta u b o t 



M A KY 



TRACY 



Frances Talbot 
Frances, you're a flirt; 
We see it in your eye, 
You need a bow and arrow, 
And this you can't deny. 



Mary Tracy 
What is there we can give to you? 
You've served the school your four years 

through, 
And, disregarding girlish pranks, 
We give you now a vote of thinks. 



20 



THE PILGRIM 



ARUtNE VA3SAR 







Elizabeth 

VENTURI 




EMMA WlRZBURGER 



Arlene Vassar 
As over the bumps of life you ride 
In your little Ford of blue, 
We hope "the one" is by your side, 
To love and honor you. 



Elizabeth Venturi 
She rushes up the stairs 
And hurries down the hall, 
Late in getting there? 
That wouldn't do at all ! 



Emma Wirzburger 
Vigor, pep, and vim — 
Always wear a grin ! 
This is Emma's motto : 
Stick to it: you'll win. 



BRUNO 

XAN GH ERI 




F^N NY 
Z AVAL 



KY 



Bruno Zangheri 
If at the moment of success 
Your mighty voice grows dim, 
We advocate Smith cough drops, 
To whisk you into trim. 



Fanny Zavalcofsky 
The hair all girls would like to have 
Is adorning Fanny's head, 
We look at it and then we say, 
"I wish it were mine instead." 



(ElaBB i>nng 

MY CLASS OF '31 
Days of cheer and happiness, 
Days of sorrow and distress, 
Days of praise and honor won 
In my Class of '31. 
Classmates faithful and sincere, 
Ever loyal through the year, 
Cherish love of tasks well done 
In my Class of '31. 

In later years through memory's haze 
Visions of these by-gone days 
Recall to mind the joy and fun 
In my Class of '31. 
Days of cheer and happiness, 
Days of sorrow and distress, 
Days of praise and honor won 
In my Class of '31. 

E. Venturi 



'31 



THE PILGRIM 



21 




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22 THE PILGRIM 



If you're feeling in a lighter frame of mind, try this over on 

your ukelele: 

HAPPY DAYS 

I 

From Junior High to Senior in a column we came streaming, 

Ninety boisterous freshmen with eyes for fun, 
And we took our places gayly with our youthful faces beaming 
And we marveled at the seniors, we deferred to every one. 
For their rank was one with graces 
And they kept us in our places 
As was right, for they were ending what we'd only just begun. 
Refrain: They were veterans in the battle that we'd only just 
begun. 

II 
We passed our first year nobly and each freshman called us 
"Master", 
As we smiled at all those children and their puerile pranks, 
For our station rose above theirs, we were moving toward the 
vaster 
Realms where we should be the leaders and the highest in the 

ranks. 
We now had greater knowledge 
And were thinking about college ; 
We were mighty marching sophomores and superior in our ranks, 
Refrain: Mighty marching sophmores much superior in our 
ranks. 

Ill 
We all stepped boldly forward to another higher place, 

Juniors with great brain power and giants (of a kind) , 
We dared to vie with seniors and could beat them in the race 
And they knew it — but they simply smiled as though they 

didn't mind. , 

We raised our banner higher 
Joyous juniors filled with fire 
We soon would be commanders with more serious thoughts in 

mind, 
Refrain: Seniors, senatorial seniors with more serious thoughts 
in mind. 

IV 

We sallied to our classrooms with our eyes turned from the sun, 

Stately, subtle seniors with our goal in view — 
We were lords of each new freshman, sophomore, junior every 
one, 
And were persons to be honored as the strictly chosen few. 
But in June our pride forsook us 
And a gripping grief quite shook us 
We were seniors pure and simple with our schooldays nearly 

through. 
Refrain: Smiling seniors pure and simple very sad at leaving, too. 
Now we go but we'll remember 
All our days at Plymouth High. 
Teachers, comrades, worktime, playtime, 
Peace be with you all! Good-bye. 

K. Davis '31 



THE PILGRIM 




BY US IN GERMANY 

pOR fifteen whole minutes I had 
sat and sat, pouting — cursing 
the world in general. I was angry 
with my mother. She had said 
"No!" — refused to let me go bare- 
footed. I, who had always been 
first. Would I fail this year? Give 
it up, tell them I couldn't? Oh, 
Temptation, go from me lest I de- 
base myself by shamefully disgrac- 
ing my ten-year-old self. I must be 
a man! 

My thoughts were interrupted. 
A roll of thunder? Surely my im- 
agination had carried me too far. 
No, there it was again. All 
thoughts fled from me but one. 
That thunder — would it or would- 
n't it? I hastily ran down to my old 
"Grosmudder." Had she heard? 
Yes! 

That was my big day and, as I 
look back, I laugh. Would that I 
were a boy again ! 

My Grandmother was saying — 
"By us in Germany storms vas al- 
vays coming. We nefer knew ven. 
Yah — yah — ," and she went on talk- 
ing of her childhood days. I heard 
her, but everything seemed far 
away, distant and (unreal. My 
thoughts were elsewhere. Every- 
thing was quiet, but for the roll of 
thunder. Occasionally a flash of 
lightning illumined the dark room 
for, in words of my Grandmother, 
"By Us in Germany we alvays 
pulled down shades. Mine mudder 
call us all together und such stories 
she tell us," — and once more the 
old lady was off, her face aglow as 
she recalled her past. 

Whenever a thunder storm ap- 
proached, I always ran to her. We 
counted the peals of thunder to- 
gether. Would it or wouldn't it? 
That was the question. If only it 
would ! Oh Thunder, do your duty ! 
My fate lies in your hands. Finally 
I interrupted the old lady. "Why 



won't it, Grosmudder? Won't the 
men that roll those barrels let me 
if I'm good?" 

All she said was, "Sh ! Listen — 
ein, zwei, — ach du Lieber! Only 
vunce more, mein shutz." 

Once more all was quiet. The 
rain came down — such a monot- 
onous atmosphere. Oh, would I 
were in Germany! Would that 
thunder — ? But wait, I must be 
patient, must not lose my faith. 
Generally she was right. 

I looked at her. A sudden light 
had come into her eyes. She uttered 
one word, "Count!" 

I did — in her tongue, "Ein, zwei, 
drei!" The last word I spoke tri- 
umphantly. 

"Grosmudder ! It's come, — the 
Thunder did it — three times." 

"Yah, yah," she said, "Es is come. 
By Us in Germany ven the little 
men roll thunder barrels ein, zwei, 
drei times, then es time for little 
boys go barefoot, and by Us in 
Germany — " 

But I stayed no longer. I had 
conquered! I was no failure! I 
would be the first to appear bare- 
foot. The thunder and Grosmudder 
with her stories of "By Us in 
Germany" had turned the trick. 

I went back upstairs, two steps 

at a time, with all the joy and glee 

of a happy kid saying to myself, 

"Ein zwei, drei; Ich lieber dich!" 

Thelma Birnstein '31 

A SENIOR'S SOLILOQUY 
"QNE more month of school — I 
count the days on the calendar, 
but — somehow the thrill of getting 
out of school is gone. 

"I wonder what it can be like — 
days of no books, no desks, no 
teachers, nights of no homelessons. 

"I do not care now if it is the end 
of school days for me, but, as I 
muse here, I wonder if my heart 
is at all affected by this sudden 
change. It will be when school re- 
opens in the fall, and I see the 



24 



THE PILGRIM 



army of children marching off to 
school — and I shall not be one of 
them. 

"There were sorrows in my 
school-days, sorrows that seemed 
very real and big then, but now 
I vaguely remember only a few of 
them. There were happy moments, 
too — moments when I felt repaid 
for my pains and labors. 

"I'll never forget that time, in 
the second grade when I turned on 
the drinking faucet and the water 
shot up to the ceiling soaking the 
teacher and most of the classmates 
near me. 

"Just think — this is the last time 
I'll sit up far into the night, wrack- 
ing my brain for an idea for a 
short story. 

"Well, I can safely and thank- 
fully say I'll carry away with me 
no regrets, no broken promises, no 
sad thoughts, but that I have in- 
side me a comfortable and satisfied 
feeling that I have done the very 
best I could — and so — what must 
be — must be." 

E. Hayes '31 

LIFE WAS WONDERFUL 
A RIEL tripped lightly down the 
street. There was a smile on her 
pretty face, for Dick Carlsan had 
just asked her to go to the Prom 
with him. Reason enough for any 
girl to be happy. Dick was the idol 
of the school, the captain of the 
football team, tall, straight and 
good-looking. Who wouldn't be 
thrilled? If Phyllis Carter knew, 
wouldn't she be wild! She and 
Carlsan had been great friends 
once, but that was all over now, 
and he had asked her, Ariel Wain- 
wright, to go to the Prom! Life 
was wonderful. Ariel hummed a 
happy little tune as she walked 
along. 

"Well, where are you going in 
such a cheery mood?" a cheery 
voice greeted her. 

Ariel looked up. Phyllis Carter 
of all people! 

"Oh, I didn't see you, Phil," 
Ariel apologized. "I — I guess I was 
day-dreaming." 

"Quite obviously they are pleas- 
ant ones! Are you going to the 
Prom Saturday?" 



"Oh, yes!" replied Ariel, "I'm 
on my way down to Webster's to 
buy some new pumps — silver ones 
to match my dress. Are you going?" 

"You bet! The honorable Mr. 
Carlsan has requested the pleasure 
of my company." 

"Mr.— Mr. Carlsan!" 

"Why not? He asked me last 
week but I refused. I was expect- 
ing Bill to come down, but he wrote 
and said it was impossible — 'aw- 
fully sorry and all that.' Oh, well, 
beggars cannot be choosers, so I 
just called Carlsan to say I'd go 
with him after all." 

"You just called him?" 

"Why are you staring at me like 
that? Isn't Carlsan all right? Of 
course, Bill is better and — " 

All right! Of course he was all 
right! The old cat! She's just try- 
ing to make me jealous. She knows 
that Carlsan just asked me ! Phyllis 
Carter, I could slap your face ! 

"Well, dear. I must go along now. 
I'll see you at the Prom. Who is 
calling for you?" 

Ariel blushed and inwardly 
cursed herself for being such a fool. 

"Oh, never mind if it's a secret, 
but he must be wonderful to make 
you blush like that." With this 
final shot, Phyllis was gone. 

Ariel no longer sang; she no 
longer smiled. "Cat!" she stormed. 
"Old cat! That's all she is! I'll call 
Dick up the minute I get home 
and — •" stamping her foot angri- 
ly— 

"Honk! Honk! The girl looked 
up. Dick! 

"Hop in, Ariel," he greeted. 
"Going home?" 

Seated in Dick's roadster, Ariel 
ventured to remark, "I hear Phyllis 
is going to the Prom Saturday, too." 

"That so?" 

"Dick Carlsan, you know very 
well she's going! You're as bad as 
she is, and I've a good mind to get 
right out and walk ! Second fiddle — 
that's all I am!" Ariel was saying 
breathlessly. 

"Why, Ariel, I don't understand. 
You're going to the Prom with me. 
Aren't you?" 

"But-but I thought you were 
taking Phyllis. She said — " 

"Oh, I see, but you've made a 



THE PILGRIM 



25 



mistake. She's going with Let Carl- 
san, the kid cousin, you know." 

"Your cousin?" questioned Ariel 
in a weak little voice. It was all 
right then! Phyllis wasn't going 
with Dick. Ariel gave a little sigh 
of contentment as she snuggled 
closer to Dick's broad shoulder. 
Life ivas wonderful after all. 

Muriel Anderson '31 

YOU SHINE FOR US 

When we were ready to give up the 

race, 
To let the other fellow forge ahead, 
You have been there, to spur us on, 
You've been our guiding star, 
Aglow there in a world of darkness, 
Discontent and selfishness, 
To tell us you'd be ever proud 
Of every honest deed we could 

achieve. 
How small that act might be 
Was naught to you, 
If it meant sacrifice, unselfishly 

bestowed — 
We were repaid an hundredfold. 
For each of us was as a separate 

light 
Which you must keep aflame, un- 
til the doors 
Were closed; so we go forth into 

the world 
Knowing that though we leave 

your portals — 
Loved by one and all — 
Your light will e'er be there. 

Alma Mater, ever rise above the 

dust of earth 
And shine for us ! 

Emma Wirzburger '31 

ON FIRST LOOKING INTO 
BURKE'S "SPEECH 
ON CONCILIATION" 

"Not withstanding the auster- 
ity—" 
(Now I wonder what that means.) 
"Acta parentum jam legere — " 
(Well, that's Latin, or so it seems.) 

"Incongruous mixture of coer- 
cion — " 
Oh, my goodness ! My poor brain ! 
Burke's "Speech on Conciliation" — 
Can I read it, yet be sane? 

Katherine Burgess '31 



) PRINCIPAL'S COLUMN : 



T HAVE just finished reading an 
address delivered by William Mc- 
Andrew, formerly superintendent of 
schools of Chicago, to the superin- 
tendents of Massachusetts at their 
recent conference at the Bridge- 
water State Normal School. Dr. 
McAndrew has been reading his- 
tory and finds that the founders of 
our government had very definite 
ideas regarding the position of 
general education in the scheme of 
things. Briefly, their conviction 
was that this nation, a democracy, 
depended on an enlightened public 
opinion for its existence and pro- 
gress, and that an intelligent public 
opinion depended on a general edu- 
cation of all the people. In accord- 
ance with this conception, Con- 
gress included a provision for edu- 
cation in the Ordinance of 1787 and 
subsequently various states adopt- 
ed laws for the establishment of 
public schools. The greatest argu- 
ment against the public support 
of education was then, and I sus- 
pect still is in some instances, that 
Mr. Jones, who has no children, 
should not be obliged to pay taxes 
for the education of Mr. Smith's 
son and daughter. This argument 
would be valid if Mr. Smith's son 
and daughter were the only ones to 
receive the benefit of their educa- 
tion, but the fact is that, theoretic- 
ally at least, they are going to be 
better citizens because of their 
training, and thus contribute to the 
upbuilding of the community in 
which they reside. Certainly Mr. 
Jones would derive benefit from 
their contribution to the better 
ordering of the state. 

Now what has all this to do with 
the members of the graduating 
class of Plymouth High School? 
Simply this. The townspeople of 
Plymouth have been paying for 
your education for twelve years. As 
far as the last six years are con- 
cerened, it would have cost vou 
from $800 to $1200 a year" to 
have received similar instruction 



26 



THE PILGRIM 



in a private school. What is going 
to be your return to the town for 
their investment in you? Those of 
you who have done your work 
thoroughly and are prepared to do 
something useful have kept faith 
with your parents and the other 
citizens of Plymouth. Those of you 
who have not done your best, and, 
unfortunately, there are some, have 
not played fair with those who 
made it possible for you to continue 
in school. 

But leaving all that aside, I trust 
your high school days have brought 
to you some conception of the prob- 
lem of living together in a commun- 
ity. Not only through certain 
studies but also through experi- 
ences, you should have learned that 
intelligent and patient cooperation 
is the only reasonable and practical 
way of managing the affairs of any 
group. Therefore, I say to the Class 
of 1931, that it is my earnest desire 
that when, in the very near future, 
they become voting citizens, their 
influence for good will be marked. 
There is much to be done. Many 
difficult problems are still unsolved, 
for nobody at present seems to 
know how to find the answers. The 
future lies in the hands of thous- 
ands of young men and women, 
who, like themselves, are about to 
have the opportunity of showing 
whether or not the community has 
made a good investment in educat- 
ing them. 

Wayne M. Shipman 



I 



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Also Fine Shoe Repairing 



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I 52 Court St. Plymouth, Mass. i 



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9 Court St. Plymouth, Mass. 

Conservatories 8 Stoddard St. 

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for all occasions 



A KITCHEN LYRIC 

Oh, give me the life in a kitchen 

small 
With its shining floors to welcome 

all, 
Its windows decked with curtains 

neat 
A place where I'll make good things 

to eat. 
Some pots, some pans, just a few, 

you know, 
Then some flour and sugar, and an 

egg or so, 
The batters and doughs, these I'll 

always make 
And then to the range to let them 

bake — 
There they will turn very crisp and 

brown, 
With some gleaming frosting for a 

crown, 
Off to the sink, soapy suds swirl 

and swish, 
Oh, such is the life that I would 
wish! 
A kitchen nook where two can eat, 
'Tis a kitchen small I'd make my 

retreat ! 

Irene Sassi '31 



THE HERO 

He was so great, so far above the 

rest, 
They envied him his power, and 

watched his gain ; 
But 'twas by Fate that he had been 

so blessed, 
So all their dreams and hopes they 

thought in vain. 

He stood for all the good and all 

the right, 
He had played the game since 

first his life began, 
They shouted forth his praise with 

utmost might — 
But in his soul he still was just a 

man. 

A man of loves and hates and 
haughty pride, 
Who yielded to temptation now 
and then — 
But Fortune lingered always at his 
side, 
And so he rose and led all other 
men. 

Katherine Davis '31 



THE PILGRIM 



27 



I 



Htttor % Jitftte Qlujmia 



i 



June 12, 1931 
Dear Anne, 

You really missed something by 
not coming to our school play. On 
Friday, April 17, P. H. S. pre- 
sented "It Pays To Advertise", 
with a good cast coached by Arthur 
G. Wooley, which is almost every- 
thing which needs to be said about 
any school play. 

Have you been feeling well 
lately? We hope you have — but, if 
not, we have a machine here that 
will grind all your troubles away 
in a minute. What am I driving at? 
Just this. Three of our playwrights, 
Lillian Arthur, Lydia Hanelt, and 
Ruth Armes, wrote a clever health 
playlet entitled "The Health Ma- 
chine". It was first presented at the 
Memorial Hall on April 10 and then 
on the following Monday it was 
repeated for us in assembly. It 
told the story of a group of people 
who didn't know how to be healthy 
and happy and who made all those 
around them uncomfortable, too. 
A good fairy appeared to them 
with a magic machine, and, when 
she had finally persuaded each of 
them to step into it, she ground 
away their ills and they became 
a happy crowd once more. 

The Senior class was in charge 
of the Spanish Fiesta this year. 
The hall was attractively decorated 
with brigth colors. Elizabeth Samp- 
son received the prize for the 
prettiest costume; she wore a 
graceful white silk Turkish cos- 
tume. Florence Probst was dressed 
as a "hobo" just off the road. She 
wore a dog collar around her neck 
and a torn derby, and she received 
the prize for the funniest costume. 
George Haigh received a prize for 
the handsomest one; his was 
of red and black, that of a Spanish 
caballero, complete with a bandana 
and sombrero. The music was good, 
and from the general atmosphere 
we think everyone had a good time. 

On Thursday, May 14, we went 
to assembly not knowing just what 
was going to happen. We found 



there Dr. Paul Wakefield of the 
State Department of Health, who 
spoke to us about tuberculosis. It 
sounds like a dreary subject, but 
Dr. Wakefield was far from boring. 
He told us not to be afraid of T. B. 
because it is easy to prevent and, if 
contracted, with the proper care 
our bodies will cure it for us. He 
gave us five ways in which to pre- 
vent and to cure T. B. 

1. Get as much Fresh Air as 
possible. 

2. Eat Good Food. 

3. Rest is Important. 

4. Get Sunshine (outside and 
in, be happy!) 

5. Have any infections such as 
bad teeth, tonsils, or adenoids at- 
tended to. 

In the fall all the pupils whose 
parents have consented are to be 
examined for tuberculosis, and, if 
necessary, ex-rays will be taken 
free of charge. 

Parlez-vous francais? It doesn't 
matter — but we want to tell you 
about the French assembly we had 
on Monday, May 17. The different 
French classes sang a few folk 
songs and then there was a play, 
"Rosalie". Fred Banzi took the part 
of M. Bol, a proud man of small 
means who wanted to make an im- 
pression upon an old acquaintance 
in order to gain social standing. 
Mme. Bol was interpreted by Ruth 
Sears and the part of Rosalie, the 
stupid maid, by Annette Chapman. 
If you had heard us laugh, you 
would have thought we understood 
every word, but it was because we 
appreciated Banzi. 

We are sorry that we won't be 
able to write to you again, but, as 
we sail on the 19th, you can see 
that there isn't much time left. 
Very sincerely, 

Nan and Fran 



The editorial staff of "The Pil- 
grim" regrets to announce that the 
short story, "Free Confession" 
printed above the signature of 
Hilda Goddard '31, has been proved 
not original. 



28 



THE PILGRIM 



FROM A GRADUATE 

State Normal School 
Bridgewater, Mass. 
February 23, 1931 
Dear "Pilgrim" : 

As a member of the editorial 
staff of "The Pilgrim," it was some- 
times my duty to solicit letters 
from members of our faculty and 
others. I never thought, however, 
that I should be asked to write for 
publication. Since no definite sub- 
ject was suggested, I shall have to 
select one that is constantly before 
me. 

The subject on which I shall 
touch is the profession of school 
teaching. So many people think 
that a teacher merely walks into a 
room, opens a book, and asks 
Johnny how much eighteen plus 
seven is — these same people do not 
realize that the teacher must teach 
Johnny two hundred and forty-five 
simple addition facts before he can 
do the problem. 

It is rather difficult to imagine 
children as problems. However, one 
of the tasks of a teacher is to sum- 
marize each pupil's individual 
faults and charactaristics — and 



that is no easy thing to do. 

One does not have to be a mem- 
ber of this school long to sympa- 
thize thoroughly with the teachers 
he has had in the past. 

The school teacher of today is a 
well-trained, well-educated pro- 
fessional — one who must follow 
higher education constantly. Per- 
haps that is the secret of success in 
any business — but certainly it is in 
school teaching. School teachers 
must keep up-to-date through con- 
stant studying. 

This subject could be the basis 
of a ten-column article Avithout 
even scratching the surface. It is 
an extremely interesting way of 
employing one's self. In conclusion, 
however, may I say that a good 
high school background is inval- 
uable, but this background comes 
only through student cooperation 
with the teacher. Advice of this 
nature seldom is heeded in high 
school — however, it does not take 
many months of experience after 
graduation before one says, "Oh, 
if I had only studied harder in high 
school !" 

Sincerely, 
Kenneth A. Cameron 




1930 



Pile-rim Staff 



1931 



THE PILGRIM 



29 




AS WE SEE OTHERS 



SUNNY DAYS 
i Greece 

It is always a pleasure 
to receive the "Sunny 
Days". The articles are 
most instructive, and we 
have learned much from 
them concerning the cus- 
toms of your country. 
Come again ! 

! THE SACHEM 
Middlehoro 

Your poetry department 
shows marked improve- 
ment. "Pah" is out- 
standing among the 
poems. The exchange col- 
umn is, as usual, very 
complete. The color and 
design of your Spring 1 
Issue are very appropri- 
ate to the season. 

K3 


THE ORANGE LEAF 
Orange, New Jersey 

The "School News" is 
presented in a most in- 
teresting style. We make 
it a point not to miss 
reading any of it. This 
fine column, we believe, 
is due to your plan oi 
having a reporter from 
each room to tell ol its 
occupants' actvities. Let 
us hear from you again! 

THE CLIMBER 
West Bridgewater 

"The Belfry Bat" is a 
very intersting column in 
your magazine. We find 
great enjoyment in pe- 
rusing your school news. 
A cut for your poetry de- 
partment would improve 
the general appearance. 


THE WAMPATUCK 
Braintree 
The "Wampatuck", in 
our opinion, owes much 
of its fine appearance >to 
the intelligent cuts at 
the head of its colums. 
We notice that your ex- 
change department, like 
many of those in the 
other papers, has em- 
ployed a new method of 
presentation, which we 
consider a great improve- 
ment. 

P3 


Ph5 

THE BLUE OWL 
Attleboro 

The omission of a poetry 
section in your magazine, 
seems to be the only 
(law in an otherwise well- 
balance paper. "Hoots" 
is an extremely humor- 
dus column. 


THE BROCKTONIA 
Brockton 

The column cuts in the 
"Brocktonia" are clever, 
and some most amusing. 
"Club Notes" is written 
in a good style. Have you 
ever considered condens- 
ing your sports news? 
We think a brief sum- 
mary of each game is all 
that is needed. 


THE ABHIS 
Abington 

Although advertisements 
arc a great financial aid 
lo any paper, we do not 
think, they should out- 
number the rest of the 
articles. Only favorable 
comments can be made 
concerning your exchange 
column and literary sec- 
tion. 



30 



THE PILGRIM 




SPORTS REVIEW 
1930-31 

TOOKING over the year's achieve- 
ments in athletics, we find that, 
while Plymouth High was very 
strong in some sports, it was com- 
paratively weak in others. 

The football team, despite pre- 
dictions, brought the South Shore 
Championship to Plymouth High 
for the third successive year. This 
our boys should repeat for the 
fourth time next season, for the 
entire varsity will return with the 
exceptions of Captain Spath and 
Sullivan. 

The basketball team had a poor 
season, but with the entire varsity 
coming back — all we say is — 
watch out. 



The track team has also been 
weak, but, since the entire team is 
returning, maybe they, too, will do 
things. 

Plymouth High swam away with 
the Brockton Y swimming meet for 
the second successive year. We're 
expecting another shield next sea- 
son as the same team will return. 

The baseball team has hit the 
winning column after three defeats 
and, barring the unexpected, it 
ought to stay in it. All the varsity 
will return with the exception of 
"Scag." 



BASEBALL 
QN the thirtieth of April, Plym- 
outh High opened itse baseball 
season by losing a close game to 
Middleboro with the score 4 to 2. 




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^»" 1 



THE PILGRIM 



31 



This game was in reality a pitchers' 
duel with Kraus of Middleboro 
having a slight edge over our own 
"Speed" Johnson. Kraus allowed 
three hits while Johnson was found 
for five. 

Two days later, on May second, 
the team journeyed to Hingham. 
For two innings our boys enjoyed 
a one to nothing lead, but then er- 
ractic support and inexcusable 
errors paved the way for an 11 to 1 
victory for Hingham. 

The following Saturday, Rock- 
land was our guest. After holding 
Rockland at the short end of a two 
to nothing score for seven innings, 
a single with three men on, which 
an error turned into a homer, cost 
our boys a 4 to 2 decision. 

On the sixteenth of May, Middle- 
boro was sent down to defeat by an 
8 to 4 score. Kraus again did the 
twirling for Middleboro and was 
found for six safe hits, while 
Bossolari on the mound for Plym- 
outh was found for nine. 

The following Monday, the un- 
defeated Hingham team journeyed 
to Plymouth. With our boys hitting 
everything in sight and Johnson 
pitching fine balls, Plymouth High 
was victorious by a 9 to 6 score. 

In the last two games our boys 
have improved greatly. While 
strong defensively, our boys have 
been rather weak offensively. This 
weakness is being rapidly over- 
come, and, behind the sterling 
pitching of Bussolari and "Speed" 
Johnson, our boys ought to go 
places in the remaining seven 
games. 

"How To Hit With Your Eyes 
Closed," by "Speed" Johnson, is the 
latest acquisition to our athletic 
library. 

"How To Run Bases With The 
Aid of Horseshoes and Rabbit 
Feet," by Harry Haley, may be 
found on the top shelf. 

GIRLS' TRACK 
'pRACK practice has begun in 
earnest, as those of you who 
have been about the building on 
Monday, Wednesday, and Thurs- 
day afternoons at 3:30 have ob- 
served. 

This year some excellent talent 



has been unearthed, and it is hoped 
that, with practice, the coach will 
be able to select a winning team. 

Listed among the contests are 
the running broad and the high 
jumps, relays, and the basketball 
throw. 

The dates of the meets have not 
yet been definitely ascertained, al- 
though a contest between two 
chosen sides, each captained by one 
of our older tracksters, has been 
arranged for practice. This affair 
promises to be interesting as the 
teams are very evenly matched. 

Let's wish our track team the 
very best of success for this season ! 
Is the motion seconded? 

Ruby Johnson '33 



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32 



THE PILGRIM 




LE TROUPE 

Un groupe de gargons, appele au 
voisinage "le troupe", s'etait ras- 
semble dans l'arriere-cour d'un 
des garcons. Chaque garcon avait 
apporte de chez lui quelque chose 
a manger et apres avoir partage la 
nourriture, ils mangeaient, tous. 

"Avez-vous deja vu le nouveau 
garcon?" demanda un des garcons. 

"Je l'ai vu avec son pere dans 
une grande auto," dit le chef du 
troupe. 'Tl ne vaut rien." 

"Non," reprit un autre, "ses 
cngles sont toujours propres, ses 
cheveux sont toujours brosses et il 
va a 1'ecole en auto." 

"Les filles pensent qu'il est gentil 
parce qu'il est si poli, mais je crois 
que, s'il voyait un souris, il courrait 
un kilometre," dit un autre avec 
mepris. 

L'objet de cette conversation 
etait Percival Lane qui etait recem- 
ment venu habiter la grande mai- 
son blanche sur la colline. Quoique 
les garcons ne le sussent pas, Per- 
cival etait tres malheureux. II vou- 
lait jouer avec les autres garcons, 
et il ne voulait pas etre toujours 
poli. En voyant les garcons jouer il 
se demandait souvent ce qu'il pour- 
rait faire pour obtenir leur amitie. 

Une occassion s'est bientot pre- 
sentee. Un jour, quand il allait le 
long de la route dans son auto, il 
a vu les garcons voler des pommes 
dans le verger de M. Dubois. II 
avait vu M. Dubois venir sur la 
route et il savait qu'il decouvrirait 
les garcons. Vite, il fait arreter 
l'auto, il descend, et court les pre- 
venir. Les garcons s'enfuient et 



Percival repart. 

Apres cela Percival devint un 
membre du troupe et il apportait 
beaucoup de bonnes choses a 
manger de la grande maison 
blanche. Les garcons decouvrirent 
qu'il detestait les filles, et quant 
aux souris — lui n'avait peur de 
rien — ni meme du bouledogue de 
M. Dubois! 

Mary Ryan '31 

NOTRE ASSEMBLEE 
FRANCAIS 

Le dix-huit mai, les eleves des 
classes de francais, sous la direc- 
tion de Mile. Baker, ont presente 
un divertissement. 

Apres que Phyllis Morse avait 
lu le Psaume XXIII en francais, 
les garcons de la premiere annee, 
aides par Bruno Zangheri, ont 
chante "Le Petit Navire;" Bruno 
Zangheri et Kenneth Tingley chan- 
tant les roles du capitaine et du 
petit mousse. Les filles de la meme 
classe, menees par Marguerite 
Reed, en costume paysan, ont pre- 
sente une autre vieille chanson, "II 
Etait Une Bergere." 

Puis les autres classes de fran- 
cais ont chante "II Pleut, II Pleut 
Bergere" et Bruno Zangheri a 
chante une des plus belles chan- 
sons que nous ayons apprises — 
"Ma Normandie." II a une belle 
voix et tout le monde s'en est joui. 

On a fait des explications de ces 
chansons en anglais pour que tous 
les eleves pussent les comprendre. 
Mile Locklin, Jane Matheson, et 
Iris Albertini ont beaucoup con- 



THE PILGRIM 



33 



tribue en accompagnant les chan- 
sons, soit au piano, soit avec le 
violon. 

La chose principale du program- 
me etait la presentation d'une pe- 
tite piece, "Rosalie", par les eleves 
de la deuxieme annee. Les person- 
nages etaient: — 

M. Bol — joue par Fred Banzi 

Mme. Bol — jouee par Ruth Sears 

Rosalie, la bonne stupide — jouee 
par Annette Chapman 

C'est une piece tres spirituelle et 
amusante. Au lever du rideau nous 
voyons M. Bol qui est en habit. II 
est tres agite car il attend une 
visite de M. Poulot a huit heures. 
II vient de rencontrer cet ancien 
camarade de lycee et il explique a 
sa femme comme il importe de le 
bien recevoir. C'est un homme tres 
riche et influent qui peut aider M. 
Bol a s'avancer. 

Rosalie, la bonne des Bol, est 
tres bete. lis essayent de lui ap- 
orendre a ouvrir la porte et a an- 
noncer M. Poulot mais elle est 
tellement stupide! 

Quand Rosalie casse une tasse du 
service neuf, les Bol la grondent 
d'une facon inouie. lis lui Stent sa 
sortie de dimanche, lui refusent 
Faugmentation desiree, comblent 
la pauvre fille de reproches. 

Soudainement on sonne. M. Bol 
commande a Rosalie d'aller ouvrir 
la porte. C'est son moment-a elle ! 
Rosalie se revolte! lis ont beau lui 
faire des promesses, lui donner de 
1'argent — Rosalie reste ferme. II 
n'y a qu'apres lui avoir fait meme 
des excuses que Rosalie consente a 
ouvrir la porte. Elle a gagne tout 
ce qu'elle veut. 

Rosalie va ouvrir, mais pensez- 
y, — elle revient sans M. Poulot! 



Apres toute cette agitation, ce 
n'etait qu'un monsieur qui s'etait 
trompe d'etage. 

Bien que beaucoup des eleves de 
1'ecole ne sachent pas le francais 
il parait que, grace au resume 
donne en anglais, et grace au tal- 
ent des acteurs, ils ont suivi Tac- 
tion et se sont bien amuses. 

A la fin du programme tous les 
eleves du departement francais ont 
chante "La Marseillaise." C'etait 
un programme varie et interessant 
dans lequel chaque eleve de fran- 
cais a pu prendre une partie. ~ 

A. Lema. '31 

COMPREHENSION 

D'abord — obscurite extreme, 

Puis — un rayon indecis 

Tremblant vaguement, 

Evitant la prise. 

Ensuite — un feu follet brillant, 

Dansant autour, 

Et, tout a coup, il se presente 

Une Lumiere eblouissante ! 

I. Sassi '31 

LA PLUIE 

Froide, humide, 
Pluie a verse 
Ruinant les vetements, 
Causant des rhumes: — 
Murs f roids et tristes, 
Des ruisseaux debordants, 
c'est affreux 
Quand il pleut! ' 

I. Sassi '31 

L'eTe 

L'Ete vient. 

Bete parasseuse — 

Et avec une insolence osee, 
11 se couche sur le doux lit vert, 
Que le Printemps vient de faire. 
K. Davis '31 



A College for Women, in Boston 

Regular college subjects plus courses in secretarial 
science, teaching, and other vocational studies. 

2 YEARS FOR DIPLOMA 
4 YEARS FOR DEGREE 

College enjoys all the advantages of being a separate college for 

women, with its own classroom buildings and dormitories, while, 

at the same time, it partakes of the many advantages that come 

to a department of a large university. 

For catalogue, address 

BOSTON UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF PRACTICAL ARTS AND LETTERS 

T. LAWRENCE DAVIS, LL.D., DEAN 
27 GARRISON STREET, BOSTON 




34 



THE PILGRIM 




EL BAILE DE LA LLAMA 

PERSONAJES 

Zorreda — bailarina, popular y her- 

mosa 
Juan — su amador 
Carlota — hermana de Juan 
ACTO PRIMERO 

(ESCENA I) 

(La accion de esta escena tiene 
lugar en el patio de Juan. Hace 
luz de luna. Sera las nueve. Zor- 
reda y Juan conversan.) 

Zorreda — j Que buena noche ! 

Juan — Si. Y jque hermosa estas! 
^Es preciso que tu bailes esta 
noche? 

Zorreda — Si, Juanito — "el baile de 
la llama." Tengo que despedirme 
prontamente. ilras tu a verme? 

Juan — Por supuesto. Me gusta 
mucho verte bailar. Tu eres tan 
graciosa. (Van hacia la entrada) 
Te acompanare a su casa. 

Zorreda — No, querido; ire sola. No 

es lejos. 

Juan — Pero, querida mia — 

Zorreda — No — Yo voy sola. 

Juan — Bien — si tu lo quieres, 
pero — 

(Se abrazan y Zorreda sale a la 
entrada. ) 

Zorreda — Hasta luego, Juanito. 

Juan — Hasta despues, alma de mi 
vida. 

ESCENA II 

(La escena tiene lugar en el mismo 
patio, mas tarde. Juan queda 
cerca de la fuente aguardando 
la hora de salir. Canta una can- 
cion de amor.) 

Carlota — (entra en el patio, corre 
a Juan, y se lanza en los brazos 
del sopreso Juan.) jJuan! 

Juan — iAy! j Hermana mia! Hace 
tres anos que te he visto. Tu has 
crecido. 



Carlota — Si. Tengo diez y seis anos. 
(Juan le dirige a un banco y se 
sientan. ) 

Juan — ^Como es que tu estas aqui? 

Carlota — La pupilaje ha terminado 
y estare en casa un rato. 

(Zorreda aparece en la entrada, 
invisible a los dos que conversan. 
Ve a la nina en los brazos de 
Juan. No sabe que es su hermana 
de el. Con visible sorpresa y 
terror y con expresion de pena 
se escapa.) 

Juan — Voy al teatro desde luego 
para ver a mi novia bailar. 
I Quieres tu acompanarme? Tu 
no has visto nunca a mi novia — 
i es tan bella ! j tan bonita ! 

Carlota — jSi! Me gusta mucho a 
verla. ^Cuando vayamos des- 
pedirnos ? 

Juan — Al instante — vengas tu. 

(Salen) 

ESCENA III 

(El teatro es lleno de gente. Hay 
canciones y bailes. Juan y Car- 
lota se sientan hacia la f rente.) 

Juan — Tu la veras luego. Ensayade 
verla detras el escenario pero no 
pude. iQue tendra sorpresa 
verte! Le dijo de ti y — 

(Hay grande animation y alguien 
anuncia "El Baile de la Llama". 
Zorreda aparece.) 

Juan — (murmura a Carlota) jHela 
ahi! 

(Zorreda es vestida en plumajes 
de rejas, amarillas, y color de 
naranjas. Baila graciosamente y 
parece mucho como llama. La au- 
diencia quedan encantada. Zor- 
reda atende a Juan. Sus ojos se 
encuentran los de Juan. Los de 
Zorreda estan llenos de pena y 
amor. Juan aparece un poco per- 
plejo. Carlota esta llena de ad- 



THE PILGRIM 



35 



miration. La baile termina y 
Zorreda, como llama languida, 
baja lentamente y graciosamente 
al suelo. Todos aplaudan y guard- 
an que ella se levante. No hace 
movimiento. Otra vez hay grande 
animation. Juan corre a la 
escena de action y se pone de 
hinajos al lado de Zorreda.) 
Juan — i Zorretita ! j Hablame ! Alma 
de mi vida, £no me escuchas tu? 
<ique hay? ; Jesus mil veces! iEs 
muerta! jSe hirio! jAqui Vds. 
tienen un pufial en la maiio de 
ella! jDios! Zorretita, tu no has 
comprendido. jYo te amaba; yo 
te amo, yo te amare siempre! 
Telon lentamente 

Muriel Anderson '31 

UNA AMIGA ADMIRABLE 
La escena representa la parte in- 
terior de un jardin. Carmela riega 
las flores. Ella aparece muy triste. 

ESCENA I 

(Maria, Carmela) 

Maria — j Hola, Carmela ! i Vas a la 
fiesta del Don Artiz esta noche? 

Carmela — Oh, Maria, no voy a la 
fiesta. Mi madre no me permit- 
ira que vaya. 

Maria — ^Pero por que no? 

Carmela — Porque ella me prohi- 
bio a ver a Enrique otra vez o ir a 
algun sitio donde esta. Mi madre 
estaria muy furiosa si Enrique 
y yo estamos juntos a la fiesta. 

Maria — Va.su madre a la fiesta? 

Carmela — No, Maria. Ella no esta 
buena hoy. 

Maria — Voy a ver a su madre 
ahora. Ella es una mujer exi- 



gcnte. Y yo procurare estar muy 
persuasiva. Hay una probabili- 
dad que su madre te permitire 
que vayas conmigo a la fiesta 
esta noche. Esperame tu aqui. 

Carmela — iCuidadita! Mi madre 
esta muy malhumorada hoy. 

(Maria se va a la casa.) 

ESCENA II 

(Maria, Carmela) (Maria entra 
en la jardin. Tiene una expresion 
complacida y contenta en la 
cara.) 

Maria — Carmela, su madre me dijo 
que tu y yo podemos ir a la fiesta 
juntas. 

Carmela — Oh, Maria! jCuanto me 
alegro ! 

Maria — Jugaremos una poca bro- 
ma a su madre esta noche. 

Carmela — ^Estas loca? 

Maria — Oh, no, querida amiga mia. 
Estoy muy cuerda. No es mas 
que un chiste. 

Carmela — jCorcholis! iMe digas! 

Maria — Me dijo que ella no quiere 
a su novio. 

Carmela — No ! j No le quiere ! 

Maria — Yo dije a su madre que 
Enrique se va a ver su tio esta 
noche el que viva cerca de cu- 
atros millas de aqui. Y — 

Carmela — Maria, ese es una men- 
tira grande. Mi madre reprend- 
eria mucho si supiese la realidad 
de su historia. 

Maria— No es toda una mentira. 
Enrique realmente va a ver a su 
tio de la tarde. jPero estara de 
vuelta por la fiesta, y entonces 
estaremos juntos ! 

Ethel Dretler '31 



It's a New English Custom 

£) R INKING tea at four o'clock is a universal English custom. It 
is the British way of combating that four o'clock fatigue. But cus- 
toms are changing . . . and many of the smart Lyons tearooms 
in England are now serving Ice Cream as well as tea. 

There's fact behind this English fancy — our English cousins 
realize that both tea and ice cream are a whip to flagging spirits 
and Plymoutheans will do well to adopt a plate of Lahey's Ice 
Cream daily to combat that four o'clock fag. 



36 



THE PILGRIM 



"Why don't they have insane 

asylums in Arabia?" 
"Because there are nomad people 

there, you sap." 



Think!" 
'What?" 
'What a hard time two cross-eyed 

people would have looking each 

other in the eye." 



"Hey, cap'n, Lief the Lucky and a 
Scandinavian have gone over- 
board — who'll I fish out?" 

"Reach for a Luckv instead of a 
Swede." 



"Johnny, are you biting your nails 

again?" 
"Aw, gee, Mother, nobody else will, 

so what's a fellow going to do?" 



"I say, porter, did you find thirty- 
five dollars on the floor this 
morning?" 

"Yas, suh, thank you suh." 



Professor: "What do you mean by 
chewing gum in my class that 
way?" 

Student : "Well, I'm only an ama- 
chewer, sir." 



"If there were three crows on a 
fence post and I shot one, how 
many would be left?" 

"Two left." 

"I'm afraid you don't get the point. 
Let me repeat the joke. There 
were three crows on a fence 
post; I shot one. How many 
would be left?" 

"Two left." 

"No. None would be left, because 
if I shot one, then the other two 
would fly away." 

"Isn't that what I've been saying? 
Two left." 



'Guess I'll go on a bender," said 
the fly starting around the pret- 
zel. 



"Is there an efficiency expert "Are you the consul's German in- 
here?" terpreter?" 
"Any fish in what expert?" "Naw, I'm an Erin boy!" 



i 




A Friendly Suggestion 

to the Girls of the 

Class of 193 1 

You are looking forward to congenial and remunerative employ- 
ment. The secretary in any good business, industrial, or pro- 
fessional office has a rare opportunity, if intelligent, ambitious, 
and well trained, to win promotion and become an executive. The 
Chandler Secretarial School of Boston is an educational institution 
of distinction and has trained and placed in desirable positions 
thousands of outstanding young women. Students are now en- 
rolling for the 48th year which opens September 14th, 1931. For 
a catalog and full information telephone Commonwealth 6570, or 
address Alan W. Furber, Sc. B., Director, 161 Massachusetts 
Avenue (near Boylston Street) Boston. Restricted enrollment. 

Shorthand systems taught 
Chandler — Gregg — Pitman — Stenotypy 



THE PILGRIM 



37 



^atttymBlmi 



The School of Engineering 

In co-operation with engineering 
firms, offers curriculums leading to 
the Bachelor of Science degree in 
the following branches of engineer- 
ing: 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 
ELECTRICAL ENINEERING 
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 




Hmtmratg 



The School of Business 

Administration 

Co-operating with business firms, 
offers courses leading to the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in the fol- 
lowing fields of business: 

ACCOUNTING 
BANKING AND FINANCE 
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 



Th Co-operative Plan of training enables the student to combine theory 
with two years of practice and makes it possible for him to earn his 
tuition and a part of his other school expenses. 

Students admitted in either September or December may complete the 
scholastic year before the following September. 



For catalog or further information write to: 

NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

MILTON J. SCHLAGENHAUF, Director of Admissions 
Boston, Massachusetts 



Compliments of 
Christopher 8C Gambini 



HARLOW'S MARKET 

Market Street 
Meat and Provisions 

Tel. 400 



DEPENDABLE— ECONOMICAL 
FUEL 

IMPORTED CLEERCOAL 
American Anthracite 

At reasonable prices — and our 
guarantee of satisfaction 

CANTONI COAL CO. 

294 Court St. Tel. 1233-W 

BRING YOUR SICK SHOES 

to the 

Plymouth Shoe Hospital 

We Guarantee Our Work 



Telephone 124-7-W Plymouth 

PLYMOUTH MOTOR SALES 

181 COURT STREET, PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

JOSEPH LAMBORGHINI, Prop. 

G ENUINE 

SALES ^gljfrgy SERVICE 

PARTS 



38 THE PILGRIM 



THE ROGERS PRINT i 

Printers of I 

"THE PILGRIM" ' 

f 

And Other School Publications ! 

Producers of j 

HIGH QUALITY PRINTING " 

20 Middle Street Tel. 165-M Plymouth, Mass. ! 

"~ ~~ i 

i 
i 



Compliments of j 

f 

OLD COLONY NATIONAL BANK 



PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



3p y^* § 

Us of / ^-as 

^^^^0^^. . Tut'BcTTSH Fuel , 

Cleanliness j 



G 



G 



! 

OMFORT ! 



ONVENIENCE j 



The Correct Things in Sport j 

and School Wear j 

Hot from the leading College Campusses ' 

They're authentic and the last word . 

You will always find this Store first ( 

with the new Styles ideas | 

MORSE 8c SHERMAN STORE j 

WM. J. SHARKEY I 



THE PILGRIM 39 



OUaaa of 1931 



40 THE PILGRIM 



AutngraphS 

(Class nf 1931 



— ELECTRICITY — 

THE GREAT EMANCIPATOR 

Electrically-operated tools and appli- 
ances have made the necessary work of 
mankind more enjoyable by relieving the 
burden of the old-time back-strain and 
drudgery. 

Are you making the fullest use of this 
20th Century Servant — Electricity? 

PLYMOUTH ELECTRIC LIGHT CO. 



PALARDY THE FLORIST 

Gut Flowers — Potted Plants 

and Floral Designs 
57 '/ 2 Court St. Plymouth, Mass. 

Plymouth Rock Hardware 

62 Court St. Tel. 951-R 

PAINT HEADQUARTERS 

SAMOSET GARAGE 

FRANKLIN CARS 

MILLAR COAL CO. 

#14.50 per ton 

stove $.50 extra 
Tel. 1567 



Compliments of 



DR. WALDO HAYWARD 



FRANK L. BAILEY 
Optometrist and Optician 

Russell Bldg., 17 Court St. 
PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

P. 8c B. St. RY. CO. 
Get the habit — Ride a Bus 



*:*X3att«3ttCSXXX5$XX3«X£XXXX5tt^^ 



PURITAN CLOTHING COMPANY 

MEN'S AND BOY'S OUTFITTERS 
Leaders in Appropriate Styles for All Seasons 

"The Home of Dependability" 
56 Main Street Plymouth, Mass* 

*~ ~~ THE PLYMOUTH 

FIVE CENTS SAVINGS BANK 

Christmas Club Payments as low as 
25c a week 

SAVINGS BANK LIFE INSURANCE FOR ALL AGES 
Main Office j^^^%\ Branch office 

Ff STABILITY / 1 

44 Main St. ^j^^lK 318 Court St. 

COMMERCIAL ACCOUNTS 
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT TRUST DEPARTMENT 




FOREIGN 
DRAFTS 

THE PLY 




SAFE 
DEPOSIT BOXES 



PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 




JYAM.lt ymnt picture* 
making ri&h* with jSep®n4» 
fflbl® KmMk Film la the yeS* 
few box — the film fchat gate 
the picture* Thais s»sa8 m» 
the exposed miU few mp®$$ 

A. 8. BUR8ANK 

19 and M €o«rt Street 




Eat Since 21825 

JOHN E. JORDAN 

"Trade Here With Confidence* 

Hardware, Paints 

Plumbing, and Heating 

Sheet Metal Work 

WILLIAM J, BERG 

Oot&ing 8C Fumislxmgs 
■for 
en and Boys 
■ou*t St, Plymouth,